What Is Behavioural Marketing?

Popular Blogs

Subscribe to our mailing list to stay up to date with the latest industry news:

Share this post:

As businesses face increasingly stiff competition, it’s more important than ever to make data-driven decisions. According to a survey by Forbes, companies that use data to drive their marketing efforts are 6x more likely to be profitable year-over-year than those that don’t (2018). That’s where behavioural marketing comes in.

By gathering data on your customers’ behaviour across various channels, you can gain insights into what drives their decision-making process. This can help you make informed decisions about how to market to them effectively. As stated by the Harvard Business Review, “companies that inject big data and analytics into their operations outperform their peers by 5% in productivity and 6% in profitability” (2017).

Behavioural marketing is a powerful tool that allows businesses to create personalized experiences for their customers. By understanding what drives their behaviour, you can tailor your messaging and offerings to their specific needs and interests. This not only leads to increased engagement and higher conversion rates but also improved customer retention and better ROI.

The objective of this blog is to provide you with a comprehensive guide to behavioural marketing, including how it works, the benefits it provides, techniques for implementation, types of behavioural marketing, best practices, and potential challenges and risks. By the end of this guide, you’ll have a solid understanding of how behavioural marketing can help you make better marketing decisions and grow your business. So let’s dive in…

So, What Is Behavioural Marketing?

Simply put, behavioural marketing is a strategy that uses data on a customer’s behaviour to deliver targeted and personalized marketing messages. By analyzing how your customers interact with your brand across various channels, you can gain insights into their needs and preferences. This information can then be used to deliver highly personalized marketing messages that are tailored to their specific interests and behaviours.

The importance of behavioural marketing lies in its ability to create a more engaging and relevant customer experience. By delivering messages that are more personalized and targeted, you’re more likely to capture the attention of your customers and encourage them to take action. In fact, for example, research has shown that personalized emails have an open rate of 29% compared to 17% for non-personalized emails (Statista, 2021).

By using behavioural marketing, you can also improve your conversion rates and increase customer loyalty. When customers feel like a brand understands their needs and preferences, they’re more likely to continue doing business with that brand. This can lead to increased customer lifetime value and a better return on investment for your marketing efforts.

In summary, behavioural marketing is a powerful strategy that can help you better understand your customers and create a more personalized and engaging marketing experience. By leveraging data on their behaviour, you can deliver targeted messages that resonate with them and drive action.

Behavioural Marketing Flow In a Nutshell

Now that we have a good understanding of what behavioural marketing actually is, let’s dive into how it works.

The first step in behavioural marketing is gathering data. This can include data from your website, social media channels, email campaigns, and more. By analyzing this data, you can gain valuable insights into your customers’ behaviour, such as what pages they’re visiting on your website, what products they’re clicking on, and what content they’re engaging with.

Next, you’ll create user profiles based on this data. These profiles will contain information about each customer’s demographics, interests, preferences, and behaviour. By having a detailed understanding of each customer, you can tailor your marketing messages to their specific needs and interests.

Understanding user behaviour is a crucial part of behavioural marketing. By analyzing how your customers interact with your brand across various channels, you can gain insights into what motivates their decision-making process. This can help you identify opportunities to improve your marketing efforts and better target your messaging.

Once you have a clear understanding of your customer’s behaviour, you can start customizing your marketing messages. This can include creating targeted email campaigns, displaying personalized ads on social media, and providing product recommendations based on their browsing history.

The final step is delivering a personalized experience to each customer. By tailoring your messaging and offerings to their specific needs and interests, you can create a more engaging and enjoyable experience for your customers. This can lead to increased loyalty and better long-term customer relationships.

The Benefits Of Behavioural Marketing

We’ve talked about what behavioural marketing is and how it works, but let’s dive into the benefits it provides for businesses.

One of the biggest benefits of behavioural marketing is increased engagement. By tailoring your messaging to each customer’s specific needs and interests, you can create a more personalized and engaging experience. According to a report by Epsilon, personalized emails have an open rate of 29%, compared to 18% for non-personalized emails (2018). This increased engagement can lead to more conversions and better long-term customer relationships.

Speaking of conversions, another benefit of behavioural marketing is higher conversion rates. By providing targeted messaging and product recommendations based on a customer’s behaviour, you can increase the likelihood that they’ll make a purchase. In fact, a study by Accenture found that 91% of consumers are more likely to shop with brands that provide relevant offers and recommendations (2018).

But it’s not just about acquiring new customers – behavioural marketing can also improve customer retention. By continuing to provide a personalized experience for your customers, you can build loyalty and increase the chances that they’ll come back for repeat purchases. In fact, a study by Segment found that personalized emails had a 14% higher click-through rate and a 10% higher conversion rate compared to non-personalized emails (2017).

Finally, let’s talk about ROI. At the end of the day, businesses need to see a return on their marketing investment. According to a study by Epsilon, companies that personalize their marketing campaigns see an average ROI of 20%, compared to 4% for those who don’t (2018). By tailoring your messaging and offerings to each customer’s behaviour, you can improve the effectiveness of your marketing campaigns and see a better return on investment.

Techniques for Implementing Behavioral Marketing

Now that we’ve covered the benefits of behavioural marketing, let’s talk about some techniques for implementing it.

The first technique is personalization. As we’ve discussed, personalization is a key aspect of behavioural marketing, and it can take many forms. From addressing customers by name in emails to providing personalized product recommendations, personalization can help create a more engaging and relevant experience for your customers. In fact, a study by Salesforce found that 76% of consumers expect companies to understand their needs and expectations (2018). By leveraging customer data to create personalized experiences, you can meet these expectations and stand out in a crowded marketplace.

Another technique for implementing behavioural marketing is through recommendations. By analyzing a customer’s behaviour and purchase history, you can recommend products or services that they’re likely to be interested in. This not only improves the customer experience, but can also increase sales and customer lifetime value. In fact, a study by Barilliance found that product recommendations accounted for 31% of eCommerce revenue (2018).

Retargeting is another important technique for implementing behavioural marketing. By targeting customers who have already interacted with your brand, you can create more relevant and engaging advertising campaigns. For example, you could show retargeting ads to customers who abandoned their cart or viewed a specific product but didn’t make a purchase. According to a study by Criteo, retargeting can increase conversion rates by 70% (2018).

Finally, A/B testing is a powerful tool for optimizing your behavioural marketing efforts. By testing different variations of your messaging, recommendations, and retargeting ads, you can identify what works best for your audience and continuously improve your campaigns. This can lead to higher conversion rates, increased engagement, and better ROI. In fact, a study by ConversionXL found that A/B testing can increase conversion rates by an average of 49% (2019).

Types Of Behavioural Marketing

Now that we’ve covered how behavioural marketing works and some techniques for implementing it, let’s dive into the different types of behavioural marketing.

First, we have web behaviour tracking. This involves tracking a user’s behaviour on your website, such as what pages they visit, what products they view, and how long they stay on each page. This information can then be used to create personalized experiences, such as showing product recommendations based on their browsing history. A study by Epsilon found that personalized web experiences can lead to a 16.7% increase in revenue per email (2018).

Email marketing is another type of behavioural marketing. By tracking how users interact with your emails, such as what links they click on and what content they engage with, you can create more personalized and relevant campaigns. For example, you could send targeted offers to customers who have recently browsed specific products on your website. According to a study by Campaign Monitor, emails with personalized subject lines are 26% more likely to be opened (2019).

Social media marketing also lends itself well to behavioural marketing. By analyzing a user’s activity on social media, such as what posts they engage with and what pages they follow, you can create more relevant and engaging content. For example, you could show targeted ads to users who have recently interacted with your brand on social media. A study by HubSpot found that personalized social media content can increase click-through rates by up to 29% (2017).

Finally, mobile app marketing is another important type of behavioural marketing. By tracking a user’s behaviour within your mobile app, such as what features they use and how frequently they engage with the app, you can create more personalized experiences. For example, you could send push notifications to users who haven’t opened the app in a while, encouraging them to come back and engage with new features. A study by Leanplum found that push notifications with personalized content have a 4x higher open rate than generic messages (2018).

Best Practices For Behavioural Marketing

Now that we’ve covered the benefits and techniques of behavioural marketing, let’s talk about some best practices for implementing it.

First and foremost, it’s important to be transparent about your data collection practices. As consumers become more aware of the ways in which their data is being used, it’s crucial to be upfront about what information you’re collecting and how it will be used. By being transparent, you can build trust with your customers and avoid any negative backlash. A study by Label Insight found that 94% of consumers are likely to be loyal to a brand that offers transparency (2016).

When it comes to collecting data, it’s also important to use only relevant data. While it may be tempting to collect as much information as possible about your customers, it’s important to focus on data that will actually help you create more personalized experiences. By using only relevant data, you can avoid overwhelming your customers with irrelevant content and ensure that your marketing efforts are actually effective.

Respecting user privacy is also a crucial best practice for behavioural marketing. Make sure that you’re following all applicable laws and regulations around data collection and privacy, and be clear about how you’re using customer data. Additionally, give users the ability to opt out of data collection or marketing communications if they choose to do so. A study by Accenture found that 87% of consumers believe it’s important for companies to safeguard their information (2018).

Finally, keep testing and analyzing your marketing efforts to ensure that they’re actually effective. By constantly analyzing customer behaviour and testing new strategies, you can fine-tune your approach and make sure that you’re providing the best possible experiences for your customers. A study by Optimizely found that companies that use experimentation and testing to inform marketing decisions are twice as likely to see a significant increase in key metrics like revenue and customer retention (2017).

Challenges and Risks in Behavioral Marketing

While there are many benefits to using behavioural marketing, there are also some challenges and risks associated with it. One of the most significant risks is the potential for privacy concerns. With so much data being collected about individuals, there is a possibility that their privacy could be compromised. This can be especially true when it comes to sensitive information such as health, financial, or personal details.

Another risk of behavioural marketing is the possibility of over-personalization. While customization and personalization can be useful for improving engagement and conversions, there is a limit to how much personalization users may find acceptable. Overpersonalization can make users feel uncomfortable or even creepy, which could lead to a negative perception of the brand.

Finally, there is also the risk of misinterpretation of data. Behavioural marketing relies heavily on data analysis to understand user behaviour and preferences. However, it is essential to interpret the data correctly to avoid making incorrect assumptions about users. Misinterpreting data can lead to ineffective or even harmful marketing campaigns.

In order to overcome these challenges and mitigate the risks associated with behavioural marketing, businesses must be transparent about their data collection practices and ensure that they are only using relevant data. They must also respect user privacy by obtaining their consent before collecting any personal information. Additionally, they should keep testing and analyzing to ensure that their marketing campaigns are effective and not misinterpreting the data.

As with any marketing strategy, it is essential to weigh the benefits and risks before implementing behavioural marketing techniques. By understanding and addressing the challenges and risks, businesses can leverage the advantages of behavioural marketing while minimizing its potential downsides.

Conclusion

In summary, behavioural marketing is a powerful approach that enables businesses to connect with their customers on a more personal level. By leveraging data and insights into user behaviour and preferences, companies can create targeted marketing campaigns that increase engagement, conversions, and customer retention. However, it is essential to implement best practices to mitigate the risks associated with this strategy.

According to a report by MarketsandMarkets, the global behavioural biometrics market size is expected to grow from $871.2 million in 2020 to $3.9 billion by 2025, at a CAGR of 34.2%. This statistic shows the potential for behavioural marketing and its importance in the future of marketing.

As technology continues to evolve, we can expect behavioural marketing to become even more sophisticated and effective. Machine learning and artificial intelligence will play an increasingly significant role in understanding and predicting user behaviour. The use of chatbots and virtual assistants will provide new opportunities for personalized interactions with customers.

In conclusion, behavioural marketing is a valuable tool for businesses looking to improve their marketing strategies. By gathering data, creating user profiles, and delivering personalized experiences, companies can improve engagement, conversion rates, and customer retention. However, it is essential to implement best practices and mitigate the risks associated with this approach. With the continued evolution of technology, we can expect behavioural marketing to become an increasingly essential part of the marketing landscape in the years to come.

If you found this blog article useful then check out more of our blogs HERE, or download our e-books free from our Resources page for more great reads! Alternatively, you can check out our Instagram profile, for regular bite-sized insights into everything marketing, business, branding and MORE!

Read On...

Talk To An Expert Today!

Get Started

Drop your details in the form and one of our experts will be in touch with you shortly to discuss the best solution for your business

Request a FREE 30 Day Trial

 

By submitting this form you confirm that you have read and agree with our Privacy Policy, our Terms & Conditions, and agree to be contacted by Unaro Limited.

Play Video
Play Video

Get Started Today

Get Started Today

Claim Your 30 Day Free Trial Today!

Start Your Free 30 Day Trial Today!